About Us

Two premium wines were released in November 2015, by Paul Roos Farming, the empowerment project of the Roos family on Rust en Vrede near Stellenbosch. Rugby legend and educator, Paul Roos, was born here on 30 October 1880 and the land is presently farmed by the fifth generation Roos family.

“It was more than thirty years ago that we started a crèche on the farm and it has made a significant difference in the lives of not only the children but also the parents,” says Tjuks Roos who farms Rust en Vrede together with his brother, Johan. “The crèche was established in 1983 for the children of full-time and contract workers and since then not a single child has had to repeat a school year.

“Our aim with the crèche is to establish a firm foundation for the children’s future,” explains Roos. “We are fully aware that the early stages of education can be crucial to a child’s further schooling and are especially proud of the fact that two former pupils of our crèche now have tertiary qualifications. In 1994 Princess Anne (in her capacity as President of the Save the Children Fund) visited our crèche and the organisation donated money for the training of our crèche teachers as health workers.”

Two wines have been launched: Die Skoolhoof, a Chenin Blanc blend, and Die Filantroop, a Shiraz blend. The grapes for these wines were grown on the farm and the wines were also made, matured and bottled here. Natural yeast growing on the skins of the grapes were used for fermentation which took place in French oak barrels. Only the wines from selected barrels were used in the final blends.

The red wine (Die Filantroop) has good ageing potential while the white wine (Die Skoolhoof) is ready to be enjoyed now.

According to Tjuks and Johan the release of these wines reaffirms the Roos family’s commitment to education. “Paul Roos is best known as captain of the first South African rugby team to tour Britain in 1906 and who named them Die Springbokken. However, he played an equally important role as educator and rector of the well-known Stellenbosch boys’ school which was later named in his honour: Paul Roos Gymnasium.”

Building South Africa one child at a time.